5 Reasons Most Diets Fail (and How to Succeed)

How to Achieve Your Diet Goals

It is very important to know the facts of how to properly diet. On average, a person gains about 11 pounds for every diet they go on. In addition, the person loses both muscle and fat while on a diet, only to gain back the fat. Ultimately, this leads to a slower metabolism and more difficulty maintaining weight.

There are 2 crucial components to sustaining weight loss through a healthy diet.

  1. Reduce appetite in a slow and measured way by regulating the neurotransmitters in your gut and brain that drive hunger and overeating.
  2. Increase your metabolism so you are burning more calories throughout the day than you are consuming.

Here are 3 simple ways to achieve these 2 components:

Eat the Right Food at the Right Time:

Eating whole, fresh food to satisfy your appetite can cut down on the carbs and sugary foods that increase hunger and slows metabolism. Never skip breakfast and avoid eating 3 hours before bed.

Less Calories is not Always Good:

Eating fewer calories to lose weight is an idea that is quickly fading. Recent studies have shown that some calories make you fat while others can make you thin. The staples of your diet should be low-glycemic foods. For example, nuts, seeds, chicken, fish, grass fed meat and greens. Grains and bean consumption should not exceed more than half a cup once a day each. Use sugar sparingly in small doses and avoid artificial sweeteners.

Low-Fat is not Always Good:

Eating fat is not what makes you fat but eating sugar does. Studies have shown that low-carb, high-fat vegan diets were more effective at weight loss than a low-fat vegan diet. Also, eating more fat and less carbs is shown to increase metabolism. Good fats makes you feel full faster and should be eaten at every meal. Examples of good fats include avocado, nuts, seeds, coconut oil, organic eggs, chicken, grass fed meats and fish.

Are you Overweight or Obese? Here is what you should know

Know your body mass index (BMI) so you can improve it.

You BMI is a measurement of body fat that is based on your height and weight. Your BMI is a major factor that your healthcare provider considers when determining treatment protocols. A person with a BMI of between 25 and 29.99 is classified as ‘overweight,’ and a BMI of 30 and above is classified as obese. People who are overweight or obese are at a higher risk for chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol. Click here to calculate your BMI.

What is causing the obesity epidemic?

Simply put, too many calories. If you are eating more calories than you are burning throughout the day, you will inevitably gain weight. The increased availability and accessibility of energy dense foods is contributing to an unhealthy increase in weight across the world. Combine that with a steady decline in physical activity and the results are fatal and very costly.

Can the course of obesity be changed?

For most people struggling with obesity, the answer is yes! Unfortunately the process is not simple, as reducing calories and increasing physical activity is not easy and not always the answer.

If you are looking to improve your diet try reading this post. Drastically reducing calories is not the best answer, because not all calories are bad. There is no quick fix to obesity, but rather micro lifestyle changes that are implemented daily and maintained for long periods of time.

To simplify your journey to a healthier you, try starting with these tips:

  1. Avoid eating saturated fats
  2. Increase the amount of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts you eat daily.
  3. Cut out sugars and sodium from your diet gradually.
  4. Exercise 15 minutes every day for the first two weeks, then push to 30 minutes every day for the next two weeks, then try an hour every day.

Enjoy the process and don’t go at it alone! Work in teams to meet your goals.

A Safe Way to Manage Obesity

Over two thirds of Americans are overweight and over one third are defined as obese and the number of people with obesity in the world now exceeds those with malnutrition (1).  Being overweight or obese significantly increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and arthritis.  Yet despite the public’s awareness of these issues, obesity remains an epidemic.

People often describe the frustrations of trying to lose weight, whether it is through failed diets or exercise programs.  They either don’t lose weight at all or lose only to gain it back a month or two later. Effective weight loss programs that allow for long term success are desired but many patients struggle despite the available resources. The time constraints of work and family are difficult to overcome and patients often need help or a jump start to get their weight loss regimen going.

The cornerstones of an appropriate diet to lose weight include lowering caloric intake, decreasing complex carbohydrate ingestion, avoiding “empty calories” such as processed sugars and regular aerobic exercise. Fad or gimmick diets that help you to lose weight fast often lead to rebound weight gain and psychological distress.  Healthy weight loss should be targeted for 1-2 pounds per week over the course of many weeks.  The first five pounds usually come off fast and then the weight loss slows down.  People get discouraged and give up during this phase as it can be the most difficult part of the process.  Additionally, many patients suffer from uncontrollable appetite while dieting and this limits the effectiveness of the diet.

5 tips for weight loss

Recent data points to unique nutritional deficiencies as a contributing factor to Obesity. The medical foods  Apptrim and Apptrim-D  are specifically designed to treat these specific nutrient and  micro-nutrient deficiencies by supplying obese patients with a bioavailable source of amino acids and nutrients.  AppTrim and AppTrim-D contain the amino acids that specifically produce the neurotransmitters that are involved in controlling appetite, hunger and satiety.  Neurotransmitters are the brain’s messengers that tell the nerves what to do and help your stomach and brain communicate with each other. Obese patients often lack the neurotransmitters required to suppress appetite and food cravings. AppTrim helps to decrease appetite, carbohydrate cravings and improves early satiety thus helping an individual maintain a diet and weight loss goals.

Several double blind placebo controlled trials using AppTrim have been performed.  These studies have demonstrated that patients taking AppTrim along with diet and exercise lost more weight and felt less hungry than patients using diet and exercise alone.  Also, since AppTrim is a medical food, it contains only ingredients that are Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA. Obesity is a very complex disease and effective management requires a comprehensive approach that includes addressing the distinct nutrient and micro-nutrient deficiencies in addition to diet and exercise. 

1. Ogden C. L., Carroll, M. D., Kit, B.K., & Flegal K. M. (2014). Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011-2012. Journal of the American Medical Association, 311(8), 806-814