Safe Alternative Therapies for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can occur after a person has been through a traumatic event, such as combat exposure, a terror attack, a serious accident, a natural disaster, or sexual or physical assault or abuse.  Not everyone who experiences a traumatic event will be diagnosed PTSD.  About 60% of men and 50% of women experience trauma in their lives and it is estimated that about  7-8% of the entire U.S. population will have PTSD during their lifetime.[1]  People who have been diagnosed with PTSD can experience  a variety of psychological and physical symptoms which include reliving the event, avoidance, negative changes in beliefs and feelings, hyperarousal, sleeplessness, muscle fatigue, and digestion disorders.

PTSD is such a complex disease, affecting the body and brain in such a way that makes standardizing treatment very difficult.  The current treatment protocols available for people suffering from PTSD can be effective but are also limited.  One of the most effective treatment protocols currently used to manage PTSD, is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).  There are different types of CBT, including Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) which is used to help a person understand how trauma can change thoughts and feelings. Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE), which is designed to condition or desensitize a person with PTSD, by helping them relive the experience through talk therapy repeatedly until the memories are no longer upsetting.  This may also include physically going to the location where the traumatic event occurred that may be intentionally avoided.[2]

Medications are often prescribed as an adjunct to CBT and other therapies used for treating PTSD. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, “Benzodiazepines and atypical antipsychotics should generally be avoided for PTSD treatment because they do not treat the core PTSD symptoms.” Pain medications are also often used to treat pain associated with PTSD, but can be very dangerous and addicitve. A recent study by a VA researcher found that veterans with PTSD were two times as likely to be prescribed opioids as those without mental-health problems. They were more likely to get two or more opioid painkillers at the highest doses. Veterans with PTSD were more than twice as likely to suffer bad outcomes like injuries and overdoses if they were prescribed opioid painkillers, the study found.

As the intelligence about the causes and effects of PTSD has improved, attention has been directed towards specific abnormalities associated with the human nervous system, particularly the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system. The parasympathetic nervous system is the “rest and digest” part of the nervous system and it is responsible for many restorative functions. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for many of the automatic body functions such as heart rate, breathing and digestion.  According to numerous studies in patients with PTSD, there appears to be a blunting of total autonomic activity, marked in particular by a reduction of nighttime parasympathetic activity. The inability of PTSD patients to effectively initiate parasympathetic activity can lead to an imbalance of nervous system activity and yield symptoms including anxiety, rapid heartbeat, panic spells and increased sweating. Parasympathetic suppression can also cause sleep dysfunction, abnormal dreams and memory disturbances. There is an emerging consensus that sleep disturbance may be a core feature of PTSD.

Improving nervous system health and balancing parasympathetic and sympathetic activity is a key component in the successful treatment of PTSD. Providing clinically validated alternatives to the currently prescribed medications is essential to improving the treatment of PTSD.   There are currently natural medication options available that can help to manage the increased physiologic and metabolic demands of PTSD. Recent studies involving the medical foods  Sentra AM® (acetyl l-carnitine HCL, choline bitartrate, l-glutamic acid) and Sentra PM® (acetyl l-carnitine HCL, choline Bitartrate, 5-HTP, l-glutamic acid)  have yielded very positive results in patients suffering from symptoms related to PTSD. These products are specially formulated using amino acids, nutrients and certain botnaicals and are believed to influence the production and absorption of neurotransmitters essential to autonomic nervous system function. They may be particularly effective at targeting symptoms of PTSD and provide a new, safe treatment option for this condition.[3] Civilians, active service and military veterans are often reluctant to seek treatment for PTSD symptoms because of the perceived stigma associated with a psychiatric diagnosis and psychiatric medications. Medical foods like Sentra AM and Sentra PM provides patients and providers with a safe, effective and reliable therapeutic alternative to the current drug protocols being prescribed.



[1] Gradus, Jamie L. “Epidemiology of PTSD” ptsd.va.gov.  January 30 2014.  Web.  June 2014.  http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/PTSD-overview/epidemiological-facts-ptsd.asp

[2] “What is PTSD?” ptsd.va.gov. January 17 2014. Web. June 2014. http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/PTSD-overview/basics/what-is-ptsd.asp

[3]Targeted Medical Pharma, Inc.. Administration of an Amino Acid-Based Regimen for the Management of Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction Related to Combat Induced Illness. Publication Pending. Print.