A Silent Killer: High Blood Pressure

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a common disease in both men and women. Hypertension is called the “silent killer” because it generally produces no obvious symptoms even while it causes widespread damage to the heart, brain, kidneys, and other vital organs. Although it can strike anyone at any time of their life, it’s most commonly seen in older individuals. In fact, over 70% of American women and 50% of American men over the age of 70 have hypertension. Other risk factors for this disease include high cholesterol levels, smoking, obesity, and diabetes.1

Normal blood pressure is defined as a systolic pressure of 130 mm Hg or below and a diastolic pressure of 85 mm Hg or below. High normal is pressures of 131-139 systolic and 86-89 diastolic. Hypertension is defined as a pressure of 140 systolic over 90 diastolic and above.

Blood pressure generally rises and falls throughout the day in a cyclic rhythm and is influenced by many factors, such as exercise and emotional stress.  To get the most accurate picture of your blood pressure, take numerous measurements at different times and average them.

Although doctors still don’t know what causes this most common type of hypertension, current research indicates that a complex interaction between genetic, environmental, and other variables is a significant factor. Secondary hypertension, which is much less common, is high blood pressure caused by known medical conditions, such as kidney disease, pregnancy, and sleep apnea.

The real dangers arise when blood pressure is elevated over a period of years or decades. Over such a time span, hypertension can cause significant damage to blood vessels that supply life-giving oxygen and nutrients to all parts of the body. The heart, brain, and kidneys, along with all other major body parts, can suffer irreparable harm from long-term hypertension.

It’s important to remember that an unhealthy elevation in just one of the two pressures (systolic or diastolic) can have disastrous long-term health consequences. Isolated high systolic pressure, which is the most common form of high blood pressure in older adults, is thought by many to be a significant indicator of heart attacks and strokes in people middle-aged and older. Isolated high diastolic pressure is a strong risk factor for heart attacks and strokes, especially in younger adults.

Hypertension Can Be Controlled Naturally

For those who hesitate to use anti-hypertensive drugs for whatever reason, non-drug strategies may significantly help in supporting healthy blood pressure. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is now recommended as a first-line approach in managing the disease. The DASH diet is high in fruits, vegetables, and other nutritious foods that are rich in potassium, calcium, and magnesium. People following the DASH diet are encouraged to decrease their saturated fats and replace them with foods that are high in monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids.

Other natural ways to control hypertension include not smoking, obesity control, and salt restriction – the current recommendation is for people with hypertension to limit their salt intake to 2400 mg (about 1 teaspoon) per day.

Arginine – The Source of Nitric Oxide

Another natural way to help support healthy blood pressure is through the use of L-Arginine based supplements.  L-Arginine is an amino acid that plays a vital role in promoting vascular health through the production of Nitric Oxide (NO).

Nitric oxide penetrates and crosses the membranes of almost all cells in the body, and it helps regulate many functions. It is even involved in memory function. In blood vessels, NO is vitally important because it regulates the tone of the endothelium, the layer of smooth cells that line the inside of the vessels. If these endothelial cells become dysfunctional, they can cause spasms or constrictions of the blood vessels that can then lead to hypertension.

Learn more about your options today. Visit www.hypertensa-adv.com for more information. 

  1. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/why-high-blood-pressure-is-a-silent-killer/know-your-risk-factors-for-high-blood-pressure

Amino Acids, Neurotransmitters and Pain Relief

Chronic pain is a complex condition that can change the way your body works. The natural chemicals (neurotransmitters) that your nervous system depends on to help manage pain and inflammation are in high demand, so making sure you have enough of them available is vital for proper relief.

Did you Know?

Amino acids and nutrients are the building blocks of  the neurotransmitters your nervous system uses to reduce the volume and frequency of pain and inflammatory signals. Addressing amino acid depletion with medical foods is a safe and easy way to restore the foundation of your nervous system’s health and an important part of any comprehensive pain management program.

5 Reasons Most Diets Fail (and How to Succeed)

How to Achieve Your Diet Goals

It is very important to know the facts of how to properly diet. On average, a person gains about 11 pounds for every diet they go on. In addition, the person loses both muscle and fat while on a diet, only to gain back the fat. Ultimately, this leads to a slower metabolism and more difficulty maintaining weight.

There are 2 crucial components to sustaining weight loss through a healthy diet.

  1. Reduce appetite in a slow and measured way by regulating the neurotransmitters in your gut and brain that drive hunger and overeating.
  2. Increase your metabolism so you are burning more calories throughout the day than you are consuming.

Here are 3 simple ways to achieve these 2 components:

Eat the Right Food at the Right Time:

Eating whole, fresh food to satisfy your appetite can cut down on the carbs and sugary foods that increase hunger and slows metabolism. Never skip breakfast and avoid eating 3 hours before bed.

Less Calories is not Always Good:

Eating fewer calories to lose weight is an idea that is quickly fading. Recent studies have shown that some calories make you fat while others can make you thin. The staples of your diet should be low-glycemic foods. For example, nuts, seeds, chicken, fish, grass fed meat and greens. Grains and bean consumption should not exceed more than half a cup once a day each. Use sugar sparingly in small doses and avoid artificial sweeteners.

Low-Fat is not Always Good:

Eating fat is not what makes you fat but eating sugar does. Studies have shown that low-carb, high-fat vegan diets were more effective at weight loss than a low-fat vegan diet. Also, eating more fat and less carbs is shown to increase metabolism. Good fats makes you feel full faster and should be eaten at every meal. Examples of good fats include avocado, nuts, seeds, coconut oil, organic eggs, chicken, grass fed meats and fish.

Are you Overweight or Obese? Here is what you should know

Know your body mass index (BMI) so you can improve it.

You BMI is a measurement of body fat that is based on your height and weight. Your BMI is a major factor that your healthcare provider considers when determining treatment protocols. A person with a BMI of between 25 and 29.99 is classified as ‘overweight,’ and a BMI of 30 and above is classified as obese. People who are overweight or obese are at a higher risk for chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol. Click here to calculate your BMI.

What is causing the obesity epidemic?

Simply put, too many calories. If you are eating more calories than you are burning throughout the day, you will inevitably gain weight. The increased availability and accessibility of energy dense foods is contributing to an unhealthy increase in weight across the world. Combine that with a steady decline in physical activity and the results are fatal and very costly.

Can the course of obesity be changed?

For most people struggling with obesity, the answer is yes! Unfortunately the process is not simple, as reducing calories and increasing physical activity is not easy and not always the answer.

If you are looking to improve your diet try reading this post. Drastically reducing calories is not the best answer, because not all calories are bad. There is no quick fix to obesity, but rather micro lifestyle changes that are implemented daily and maintained for long periods of time.

To simplify your journey to a healthier you, try starting with these tips:

  1. Avoid eating saturated fats
  2. Increase the amount of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts you eat daily.
  3. Cut out sugars and sodium from your diet gradually.
  4. Exercise 15 minutes every day for the first two weeks, then push to 30 minutes every day for the next two weeks, then try an hour every day.

Enjoy the process and don’t go at it alone! Work in teams to meet your goals.

A Safe Way to Manage Obesity

Over two thirds of Americans are overweight and over one third are defined as obese and the number of people with obesity in the world now exceeds those with malnutrition (1).  Being overweight or obese significantly increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and arthritis.  Yet despite the public’s awareness of these issues, obesity remains an epidemic.

People often describe the frustrations of trying to lose weight, whether it is through failed diets or exercise programs.  They either don’t lose weight at all or lose only to gain it back a month or two later. Effective weight loss programs that allow for long term success are desired but many patients struggle despite the available resources. The time constraints of work and family are difficult to overcome and patients often need help or a jump start to get their weight loss regimen going.

The cornerstones of an appropriate diet to lose weight include lowering caloric intake, decreasing complex carbohydrate ingestion, avoiding “empty calories” such as processed sugars and regular aerobic exercise. Fad or gimmick diets that help you to lose weight fast often lead to rebound weight gain and psychological distress.  Healthy weight loss should be targeted for 1-2 pounds per week over the course of many weeks.  The first five pounds usually come off fast and then the weight loss slows down.  People get discouraged and give up during this phase as it can be the most difficult part of the process.  Additionally, many patients suffer from uncontrollable appetite while dieting and this limits the effectiveness of the diet.

5 tips for weight loss

Recent data points to unique nutritional deficiencies as a contributing factor to Obesity. The medical foods  Apptrim and Apptrim-D  are specifically designed to treat these specific nutrient and  micro-nutrient deficiencies by supplying obese patients with a bioavailable source of amino acids and nutrients.  AppTrim and AppTrim-D contain the amino acids that specifically produce the neurotransmitters that are involved in controlling appetite, hunger and satiety.  Neurotransmitters are the brain’s messengers that tell the nerves what to do and help your stomach and brain communicate with each other. Obese patients often lack the neurotransmitters required to suppress appetite and food cravings. AppTrim helps to decrease appetite, carbohydrate cravings and improves early satiety thus helping an individual maintain a diet and weight loss goals.

Several double blind placebo controlled trials using AppTrim have been performed.  These studies have demonstrated that patients taking AppTrim along with diet and exercise lost more weight and felt less hungry than patients using diet and exercise alone.  Also, since AppTrim is a medical food, it contains only ingredients that are Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA. Obesity is a very complex disease and effective management requires a comprehensive approach that includes addressing the distinct nutrient and micro-nutrient deficiencies in addition to diet and exercise. 

1. Ogden C. L., Carroll, M. D., Kit, B.K., & Flegal K. M. (2014). Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011-2012. Journal of the American Medical Association, 311(8), 806-814

The Nutrient Management of Hypertension

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is elevated.  Blood pressure measures the force pushing outward on your arterial walls.  Since your body needs oxygen to survive, it is carried throughout the body.  Every time that your heart beats it is pumping oxygen through a network of blood vessels and capillaries.  There are two forces to every heart beat.  The first force occurs as blood pumps out of the heart and into the arteries that are part of the circulatory system, also known as systolic pressure.  The second force is created as the heart rests in between heartbeats, also known as diastolic pressure.  These are the two numbers that a person can see in a blood pressure reading.  Problems arise when there is too much force on the heart.  This can lead to conditions such as vascular weaknesses, vascular scarring, increased risk of blood clots, increased plaque build-up, tissue and organ damage from narrowed and blocked arteries, and increased workload on the circulatory system.  When cholesterol or plaque builds up because of scarring, the heart has to work harder in order to pump blood to the arteries.  This can eventually result in damage to the heart which can ultimately lead to heart failure.  This disease affects 76.4 million adults in the United States and can lead to heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure.

Hypertension is usually a symptomless condition with complications.  Usually people only feel symptoms in extreme readings, for example if their systolic reading is 180 or their diastolic is 110.  This is what is known as a hypertensive crisis.  It is important that adults be familiar with their blood pressure numbers on a consistent basis in order to prevent this disease from causing serious health issues.

There are simple ways to help control a person’s blood pressure.  According to the American Heart Association, there are 8 main ways to adopt a healthy lifestyle.  Eat a better diet (including reducing salt), regular physical activity, maintain a healthy weight, manage stress, avoid tobacco smoke, comply with medication prescriptions, limit alcohol, and understand hot tub safety.

Prescription medication is commonly used to help patients manage hypertension effectively.  One of the most commonly prescribed medications is lisinopril, a type of ACE Inhibitor that helps relax blood vessels keeping blood pressure low.  As with any drug therapy, there are good and bad side effects associated with lisinopril.  For example, lisinopril and other ACE inhibitors can cause a wide range of side effects, some less serious than others such as cough, dizziness, weakness, headaches, or nausea.  More serious side effects include swelling, difficulty breathing or swallowing, fever, fainting, and chest pain. Any patient taking this class of drugs should be aware of these side effects and monitor themselves at the onset of therapy and periodically throughout the course of therapy to ensure that the medication is more beneficial than harmful.

Another popular prescription option for patients with hypertension, are calcium channel blockers.  Calcium channel blockers relax and open up narrowed blood vessels by preventing calcium from entering the smooth muscle cells of the heart and arteries. The common side effects of this class of medications include headache, swelling, dizziness, flushing, fatigue, nausea, and palpitations.

Diuretics are also commonly prescribed and help expel excess sodium and fluid from the body in order to help control blood pressure.  Some of the side effects associated with diuretics are arrhythmia, extreme tiredness or weakness, muscle cramps, dizziness, fever, and dehydration.

Beta-blockers are also commonly used to treat hypertension. This class of medication is used to reduce heart rate, the heart’s workload, and the heart’s output of blood by preventing certain hormones from stimulating the heart. Side effects of beta blockers include diarrhea, depression, vomiting, depression, nightmares, and hallucinations.  One of the main dangers of beta-blockers is that if they are withdrawn suddenly conditions like angina can worsen, causing heart attacks or sudden death.

Doctors often hesitated to prescribe ACE inhibitors, beta blockers and diuretics until a patient’s blood pressure reaches 160/100. Anything below that level is deemed “mild hypertension” and not considered imminently dangerous, so a drugs’ potential side effects might outweigh their benefits. For patients with mild to moderate hypertension, nutritional interventions are commonly used in an effort to prevent the disease from progressing to a life threatening state.

A safe alternative for Hypertension is a medical food like Hypertensa® which are commonly used to expand blood vessels and improve blood flow through a natural pathway.  This class of medications addresses the increased nutritional demands of hypertension.  It uses specific amino acids and nutrients that are responsible for regulating blood pressure and vascular function.  Unlike drugs, medical foods address the production of the specific neurotransmitters that drive all the automatic functions of your body including heart rate and blood pressure.  Hypertension and many drugs that treat hypertension can alter the way the body uses these substances which are derived from both the diet and internal metabolic processes, creating deficiencies which cannot be fixed by altering diet alone.  By addressing the increased metabolic requirements of hypertension with nutritional interventions, the body will have the tools that it needs to help regulate blood pressure and heart rate.

Alternatives to Opioid Pain Medications for Injured Workers

Workplace injuries affect approximately 4.1 million Americans annually (1) .  More than half of these injured individuals will have to miss work and receive long-term medical care.  Worker’s compensation plans provide partial wages during the time of injury and recovery period in addition to covering the cost of medical care.  The recent trend among physicians treating work related injuries has been the practice of prescribing high and sometimes dangerous doses of opioid pain medications for extended periods of time.  Data from 2005-2008 in 17 states showed an average number of 1,599 cases requiring narcotics for non-surgical cases, with more than seven work days missed due to injury(2).  Additionally, in an average of 6% of these cases, the narcotics were prescribed for long-term periods of time.  These drugs may include but are not limited to hydrocodone, fentanyl, methadone, and oxycodone.  Approximately 50-90% of injured workers will receive narcotics for chronic pain conditions (3).  Opioid pain medications can have deadly side effects and the increased availability and dosages of these medications can be detrimental to an injured worker and prolong the time it takes to return to work.

Opioid pain medications are the most commonly prescribed medication in the United States(4).  They work to decrease the perception of pain and increase pain threshold.  While these drugs are helpful to decrease overall pain of various injuries and conditions, they are highly addictive and only address a portion of the pain process.  Common side effects may be mild such as constipation and fatigue, however, they have also been linked to more severe side effects including sleep apnea, decreased hormone production, and increased falls and broken bones among the elderly population(4).  Additionally patients taking opioid pain medications for long periods of time can become addicted and experience serious symptoms of withdrawal which include nausea, shaking, chills, and sweating when finishing a course of these medications (5).  Lately there has also been in an increase in drug overdose leading to death.  In a study that observed 10,000 patients who were prescribed opioids for 90 days, 51% experienced at least one overdose, and six individuals died as a result of overdose 6.  In 2008 the number of deaths resulting from overdose reached nearly 15,000 individuals(1).

Increased availability and access to opioid pain medications is one of the main problems leading to addiction and overdose among injured workers.  Some physicians are prescribing these medications to treat acute and long-term pain disorders such as arthritis and musculoskeletal pain.  Oftentimes high doses are prescribed and the dosage continues to increase over time as tolerance to the effects of the medications increases.  Instead of treating the underlying physiological conditions causing the painful condition, opioid pain medications are prescribed to help manage and mask the pain associated with a work related injury. They are prescribed for many reasons, however, a few of the most common are pressure from patients to prescribe a strong medication that will lead to decreased pain, as well as pressure from insurance companies to prescribe the most cost-effective generic pain medications. Patients may experience temporary pain relief while on these medications, however chronic pain may persist long after the injury has healed.

Prescribing high dose opioid pain medications for work related injuries often leads to other injuries and physiologic impairments.  In many cases, patients remain out of work for much longer than individuals who are not prescribed opioids, as they often develop new health conditions and require more medications.  In the study conducted by the Danish Health Interview Survey in 2000 observing 10,434 individuals, patients who were not prescribed opioid pain medications to treat their injuries recovered four times more often than individuals prescribed opioid pain medications(7).  Additionally, in this study patients taking opioid pain medications were shown to have a lower quality of life and higher death risk than those patients managing pain without opioids.

Some patients who are prescribed opioid pain medications, especially long-term, may develop other serious conditions such as obesity, mood disorders, and depression.  An injured worker who is taking medication for a pain condition may not be able to exercise regularly and weight gain is fairly common.  Opioid pain medications can also have an effect on overall mood and quality of life.  If an individual takes these medications long-term it can be very hard to stop taking them.  The patient can experience large amounts of anxiety and depression when decreasing the dosage or attempting to discontinue the medication all together.  Research has found that of the 1.9 million workers claims that were filed between 2007-2008, those who previously had or developed a co-morbidity as a result of injury such as depression, obesity, or hypertension, experienced more costly treatments and often longer treatment plans all together(8).

Work related injuries will continue to be an issue for insurers and employers.  The overprescribing of opioid pain medications in this country must be addressed by physicians, insurance companies, and drug manufacturers.   The conversion of acute pain to chronic pain associated with a work related injury can be managed in a more efficient way that will allow an injured worker to return to work as soon as they are healed without the burden of addiction or other opioid pain medication related side effects.  Theramine can be used as a complimentary or standalone therapy among this vulnerable population and can provide treating physicians with the ability to prescribe the lowest effective dose of an opioid pain medication while addressing the underlying pathology of the pain process.

Theramine is a prescription only medication regulated by the FDA as a medical food. Medical foods are prescription only medications which address the underlying pathology of pain associated with the work related injury or illness.  Theramine is clinically proven to correct amino acid deficiencies associated with chronic pain syndromes, and improve the overall perception of pain(9).  Theramine is designed to manage the increased nutritional requirements associated with acute or chronic pain conditions.  Theramine is a proprietary amino acid formulation that, by providing neurotransmitter precursors, helps stimulate production of neurotransmitters that are often deficient in pain conditions.  The ingredients in Theramine are Generally Recognized as Safe by the FDA, and are specially formulated utilizing a proprietary Targeted Cellular Technology to facilitate the uptake and metabolizing of milligram quantities of amino acids and other nutrients.  There have been no reported adverse side effects associated with the clinical application of over 50 million individual doses of Theramine. The most common side effects associated with amino acid therapies are headache, dry mouth, and upset stomach and are often short term, and can be decreased with increased fluid intake.  Theramine can be administered in conjunction with the lowest effective doses of an opiate or NSAID pain medication without loss of efficacy(10).  Treating work related injuries with Theramine may prove to be one possible medication solution to control pain and help decrease the quantity and dosages of opioid pain medications administered in the United States.

1)      http://www.workers-comp-news.com/injury_stats.php

2)      http://www.wcrinet.org/studies/public/books/WCRI_2012_Annual_Report.pdf

3)      http://ehstoday.com/health/workers-compensation/injured-workers-opiate-addiction-0209/

4)      http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/09/health/opioid-painkiller-prescriptions-pose-danger-without-oversight.html?pagewanted=all

5)      http://www.opiates.com/opiate-withdrawal.html

6)      http://www.crcotp.com/crcotp_featured/even-when-prescribed-opioids-can-cause-addiction-and-overdose.php

7)      A Population-based Cohort Study on Chronic Pain:The Role of Opioids Per Sjøgren, MD, DMSC,* Morten Grønbæk, PhD, Vera Peuckmann, PhD,  and Ola Ekh-+olm, PhDw, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010.

8)      http://coventrywcs.com/web/groups/public/@cvty_workerscomp_coventrywcs/documents/webcontent/c054910.pdf

9)      Shell WE, Silver D, Charuvastra E, Pavlik S, Bullias D; “Theramine and Ibuprofen for the treatment of chronic low back pain double blind clinical trial”, 2010 Targeted Medical Pharma Inc.

10)   Shell WE et al.; “Theramine and Naproxen for the treatment of low back pain, a double bind clinical trial”; Americal Journal of Therapeutics April,2012.

Pain Management in Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is spread through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks, also known as deer ticks.  Ticks can attach to any part of the human body, but tend to reach areas that are difficult to see such as the groin, armpits, or scalp.  Ticks must be attached for 36 hours or more before the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, can be transmitted.

There are four stages in the progression of Lyme disease.  The first stage, known as the early localized stage, takes place between 3-30 days after the tick bite.  The infected person can experience fatigue, chills, fever, headache, muscle and joint aches, and swollen lymph nodes.  One of the most prominent signs of this stage is the Erythema migrans rash, also known as the bull’s-eye rash for its unique shape.  This rash occurs in 60% of infected individuals. (CDC)

The second stage is known as the early disseminated stage and it occurs days to a week after the tick bite if the bite is not treated within the early localized stage.  During this stage, a person starts to experience more noticeable and serious symptoms.  These symptoms include Facial or Bell’s palsy, additional erythema migrans rashes, and stiffness due to meningitis.  At this point, patients begin to feel shooting pains that can interfere with sleep as well as pain and swelling in the large joints.

If the disease is not treated, 60% of patients enter into the late disseminated stage which happens months to years post-tick bite.  These individuals typically develop arthritis with severe pain and swelling in the joints.  It is typically found in the larger joints, for example the knees.  Arthritis caused by Lyme disease exhibits itself differently than other causes of arthritis.  Lyme arthritis is similar to osteoarthritis because of stiffness due to painful swollen joints.  This happens because Lyme bacteria invade the joints and cause inflammation to the tissue that lines the joints, and eventually, if untreated, can cause the cartilage within the joints to become damaged.[1]

The final stage is the lingering symptoms after treatment.  About 10-20% of patients experience symptoms after the patient has taken antibiotics.  This is called Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS).  Some evidence shows this is due to an autoimmune response, in which the immune system is continuing to respond after the infection has been cleared, causing damage to be done to a body’s tissues.  Symptoms of PTLDS can include muscle and joint pain, cognitive defects, sleep disturbance, and fatigue. (CDC)

The quicker a doctor is able to diagnose Lyme disease, the quicker they can treat it.  Patients can be prescribed antibiotics in order to rid their system of the bacteria.  Most patients who are prescribed the antibiotic during the early stages usually recover quickly and completely.

With the antibiotics working to take care of the bacteria, what is taking care of the pain associated with Lyme disease?  A patient can still be experiencing pain while taking these antibiotics, which progressively becomes worse throughout all the stages Lyme disease.  Patients who experience pain in association with Lyme disease are less likely to be active, sleep well, or eat properly due to pain.

Commonly prescribed pain medications are opioids and NSAIDs.  Both, although common, can be very dangerous.  According to a report released by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, there can be consequences when choosing to use an opioid.  Opioids are easy to abuse because of their addictive qualities.  Regular or long term use of opioids can lead to physical dependence and addiction. Once a patient stops using opioids, they can experience withdrawal symptoms such as restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps, and involuntary leg movements.  An overdose can cause severe respiratory depression and death. [2]

NSAIDs, although effective in treating pain and inflammation, are linked to adverse side effects which make them inappropriate for use in many patient populations.  There are several serious side effects and toxicity related to use of traditional NSAIDs which can lead to costly hospitalizations or death.  A study on the effects of NSAID induced side effects in the elderly reflected the average direct costs of GI side effects per patient-day on NSAIDs were 3.5 times higher than those of a patient-day not on NSAIDs. Seventy percent of the cost was attributed to GI events resulting from NSAID treatment.[3]  Treatment of GI problems alone caused by the use of NSAIDs is estimated to add over 40% to the cost of arthritis care.[4]

Stephen Harrod Buhner’s book “Healing Lyme Disease Coinfections” discusses an alternative to these common pain medications called Theramine®. Theramine is a medical food specifically designed for the dietary management of pain syndromes. This specialized natural product, provides the specific amino acids and nutrients required by the brain and nervous system to effectively reduce pain and inflammation. Theramine is non-addictive and is not associated with adverse GI or cardiovascular side effects.  It is used in clinical practice to reduce inflammation and improve pain perception by addressing the increased nutritional requirements of pain syndromes.  In two double blind, multi-center clinical studies comparing Theramine and an NSAID, Theramine was shown to be more effective at treating pain and inflammation than either naproxen or ibuprofen. Lyme disease can alter the metabolic requirements of the body, leading to specific amino acid and nutrient deficiencies. Effectively managing the increased demand for these essential physiologic components should be an integral part of any pain management protocol.

 


[1] American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. “Effective treatment of Lyme-disease-related arthritis depends on proper diagnosis.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2011.

<www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110202132605.htm>.

[2] “Prescription Drugs: Abuse and Addiction” NIDA. October 2011. National Institute on Drug Abuse.

[3] Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 August; 52(2): 185–192. Cost of prescribed NSAID-related gastrointestinal adverse events in elderly patients

[4] Bloom, BS. Direct medical costs of disease and gastrointestinal side effects during treatment for arthritis. Am J Med. 1988; 84(2A): 20-24

Pain Management without Harmful Side Effects

The reduction and management of pain can involve many approaches: prescription medicines, over the counter medicines, medical foods, cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, surgery, nutritional modification, pain education, massage, biofeedback, music, guided imagery, laughter, distraction, acupuncture, and nerve stimulation.  Two or more approaches combined can have a synergistic or additive effect that is greater than the sum of the parts.  One approach, medical foods, has medicinal value that is just beginning to be understood and can be used as a stand-alone therapy or adjacent treatment for chronic pain.

Due to its’ additive effect and low side-effect profile, Theramine®, a medical foods, can be used with high-risk patients over the age of 65 as an alternative to NSAIDs or narcotics.  Adding Theramine to a pain treatment protocol can lead to a reduction in previously prescribed narcotics and minimize the use of NSAIDs or both.  The ingredients in Theramine are Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) by the FDA, have no risk of addiction or adverse GI or cardiovascular side effects.  Reducing the burden of adverse side effects while improving clinical outcomes is critical for the overall patient care and a return to activities of daily living.

Two studies comparing Theramine to a low dose NSAIDs in adults 18 years of age and above found Theramine to be more effective than either naproxen or ibuprofen alone for inflammatory pain.  When Theramine was given in combination with the low dose of either product the results were even more beneficial.  Incorporating the use of Theramine into a clinical pain management protocol, allows physicians the flexibility to use less of a narcotic or NSAID pain reliever and potentially eliminate their use all together.

The two studies comparing the medical food Theramine and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, Theramine was shown to be more effective than low dose NSAIDs in treating low back pain.  Clinical data indicates significant reduction in back pain with the administration of Theramine alone, and as an adjunct therapy to a low dose NSAID, while administration of a low dose NSAID had no appreciable effect on pain. The use of Theramine as either a standalone or adjunct therapy can significantly improve pain perception.

Theramine is encapsulated with a patented technology that promotes the rapid cellular uptake and conversion of milligram amounts of amino acids and nutrients into the specific neurotransmitters responsible for modulating pain and inflammation.  This patented technology allows Theramine to be effective without losing efficacy over time.

Two multicenter double blind trials have established the safety and efficacy of Theramine in the treatment of chronic back pain. Pain fell by 63% with administration of Theramine and an NSAID as measured by the Roland- Morris Index (Figure 1), and by 62% as measured by The Oswestry Disability Index.

Pain Scale Graph

Traditional pain medication will always have its place in therapeutic treatment and, if used properly, is very effective.  However, physicians, insurance companies, employers and patients are requesting safer, more effective alternatives to treat pain without harmful and costly side effects. The rapidly increasing population of patients 65 years of age and older is a major concern for both physicians and insurance companies as the pain-related costs to overall U.S. health care expenses are likely to rise proportionally as well. The economic impact of pain is certain, as are the physical, emotional, and social impact for millions of people. Reducing the burden of treating chronic pain is a societal necessity, a medical challenge, and an economic requirement.

#medicalfoods #NSAIDs #theramine

The Nutritional Needs of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) May Not Be Met By Diet and Supplements Alone

While autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder influenced by genetic and environmental factors, researchers and families are increasingly focusing on the nutritional deficiencies associated with the disorder. Researchers are finding specific nutritional insufficiencies and metabolic abnormalities associated with ASD while parents aggressively try a variety of diets and supplements despite a lack of formal data.

There are currently no safe and effective treatment options for the three core characteristics of ASD, so many parents seek out alternative methods for managing the symptoms of the disease. In many cases, certain foods such as casein (milk protein) and gluten (wheat protein) are excluded from diets in an attempt to modify behavior. This approach, although sometimes effective, does raise concerns about potential nutritional deficiencies that can affect brain and body development. Others provide supplements without any assurance that the nutrients are adequately absorbed. Scientists working with Medical Foods are convinced that by offering a combination of amino acid precursors to specific neurotransmitters, provided under a physician’s supervision, there might be a solution. Based on positive preliminary investigational results, they are designing clinical studies to prove their hypothesis.

The history of nutrition and autism begins with the knowledge that vitamins, minerals and amino acids are critical to human health and that poor diet is a major contributing factor to many child health problems, including rickets (calcium/vitamin D deficiency), anemia (low iron), hypothyroid (low iodine), and scurvy (vitamin C deficiency). Research has demonstrated that there are nutritional deficiencies associated with developmental disabilities such as attention deficit disorder and intellectual development. Those with ASD have the same needs for calcium and protein and in addition were found to have more essential amino acid deficiencies consistent with poor protein nutrition than an age/gender matched control group.[i] Those on restricted diets tended to have lower plasma levels of essential acids including the neurotransmitter precursors tyrosine and tryptophan than both controls and children with autism on unrestricted diets.  A 2013 study of 55 children with ASD found Low levels of biotin, plasma glutathione, and plasma tryptophan and several other measures; and also high levels of oxidative stress markers and plasma glutamate.[ii] Work continues examining the role of glutathione – a small peptide derived from the amino acids glutamic acid, glycine and cysteine and the body’s chief detoxifier.

Understanding the nutritional status of ASD means not just looking at diet and intake, but also examining digestion, absorption, metabolic processing, metabolic demand, metabolic turn over rate and elimination. Each of these plays a role in nutritional insufficiency and altered metabolic turnover rates. For example, the use of nutritional supplements without taking into account the processing capacity of receptors involved in the metabolism of these nutrients or their ability to get beyond the blood brain barrier can result in uneven absorption or simply generate a nutrient-rich urine without clinical benefit or long-term improvement in behavior.Female_Scientific_Research

Scientists at Targeted Medical Pharma, a Los Angeles based biotechnology company are convinced that the patented technology behind their medical foods, Targeted Cellular Technology (TCT) addresses these issues. TCT is an integrated molecular system that facilitates the uptake and utilization of nutrients by target cells within the nervous system. This patented five step system consists of (1) specific neurotransmitter precursors such as amino acids and nutrients; (2) a stimulus for the neuronal uptake of these precursors by specific neurons; (3) an adenosine antagonist that blocks the inhibitory effect of adenosine on neuronal activity (adenosine brake); (4) a stimulus to trigger the release of the required neurotransmitters from targeted neurons; and (5) a mechanism to prevent attenuation of the precursor response, a well known phenomenon associated with amino acid, nutrient and drug administration. Use of Targeted Cellular Technology improves the metabolic efficiency of neurotransmitter synthesis, thereby reducing the amounts of precursors needed to correct neurotransmitter imbalances. TCT synchronizes the availability of the neurotransmitter precursor supply with the fluctuating demand for the corresponding neurotransmitters.

A recent investigator initiated clinical observation looked at 26 children who were diagnosed with ASD or suffering from related symptoms including explosive behavior, social isolation, and mood disorder, treated for a time period ranging between 30 days and one year using an amino acid based formulation of TCT based medical foods. The investigator reported significant improvement with regards to decreased disruptive outbursts, improved socialization, improved mood and reduction in drug dose. Scientists hypothesized that nutritional insufficiency and metabolic imbalances that play a role in ASD may be dramatically improved using the approach of certain medical foods. They are now using an autism-specific formulation with milligram amounts of amino acid precursors and other biogenic ingredients designed to correct nutritional deficiencies associated with ASD. They plan test their hypothesis in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study.


 

[i] Arnold, et al. Plasma amino acids profiles in children with autism: potential risk of nutritional deficiencies. J Autism Dev Disord. 2003 Aug;33(4):449-54.

[ii] Adams, J. Summary of Dietary, Nutritional, and Medical Treatments for Autism. Arizona State University, Autism Research Institute.