A Silent Killer: High Blood Pressure

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a common disease in both men and women. Hypertension is called the “silent killer” because it generally produces no obvious symptoms even while it causes widespread damage to the heart, brain, kidneys, and other vital organs. Although it can strike anyone at any time of their life, it’s most commonly seen in older individuals. In fact, over 70% of American women and 50% of American men over the age of 70 have hypertension. Other risk factors for this disease include high cholesterol levels, smoking, obesity, and diabetes.1

Normal blood pressure is defined as a systolic pressure of 130 mm Hg or below and a diastolic pressure of 85 mm Hg or below. High normal is pressures of 131-139 systolic and 86-89 diastolic. Hypertension is defined as a pressure of 140 systolic over 90 diastolic and above.

Blood pressure generally rises and falls throughout the day in a cyclic rhythm and is influenced by many factors, such as exercise and emotional stress.  To get the most accurate picture of your blood pressure, take numerous measurements at different times and average them.

Although doctors still don’t know what causes this most common type of hypertension, current research indicates that a complex interaction between genetic, environmental, and other variables is a significant factor. Secondary hypertension, which is much less common, is high blood pressure caused by known medical conditions, such as kidney disease, pregnancy, and sleep apnea.

The real dangers arise when blood pressure is elevated over a period of years or decades. Over such a time span, hypertension can cause significant damage to blood vessels that supply life-giving oxygen and nutrients to all parts of the body. The heart, brain, and kidneys, along with all other major body parts, can suffer irreparable harm from long-term hypertension.

It’s important to remember that an unhealthy elevation in just one of the two pressures (systolic or diastolic) can have disastrous long-term health consequences. Isolated high systolic pressure, which is the most common form of high blood pressure in older adults, is thought by many to be a significant indicator of heart attacks and strokes in people middle-aged and older. Isolated high diastolic pressure is a strong risk factor for heart attacks and strokes, especially in younger adults.

Hypertension Can Be Controlled Naturally

For those who hesitate to use anti-hypertensive drugs for whatever reason, non-drug strategies may significantly help in supporting healthy blood pressure. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is now recommended as a first-line approach in managing the disease. The DASH diet is high in fruits, vegetables, and other nutritious foods that are rich in potassium, calcium, and magnesium. People following the DASH diet are encouraged to decrease their saturated fats and replace them with foods that are high in monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids.

Other natural ways to control hypertension include not smoking, obesity control, and salt restriction – the current recommendation is for people with hypertension to limit their salt intake to 2400 mg (about 1 teaspoon) per day.

Arginine – The Source of Nitric Oxide

Another natural way to help support healthy blood pressure is through the use of L-Arginine based supplements.  L-Arginine is an amino acid that plays a vital role in promoting vascular health through the production of Nitric Oxide (NO).

Nitric oxide penetrates and crosses the membranes of almost all cells in the body, and it helps regulate many functions. It is even involved in memory function. In blood vessels, NO is vitally important because it regulates the tone of the endothelium, the layer of smooth cells that line the inside of the vessels. If these endothelial cells become dysfunctional, they can cause spasms or constrictions of the blood vessels that can then lead to hypertension.

Learn more about your options today. Visit www.hypertensa-adv.com for more information. 

  1. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/why-high-blood-pressure-is-a-silent-killer/know-your-risk-factors-for-high-blood-pressure

A Safe Way to Manage Obesity

Over two thirds of Americans are overweight and over one third are defined as obese and the number of people with obesity in the world now exceeds those with malnutrition (1).  Being overweight or obese significantly increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and arthritis.  Yet despite the public’s awareness of these issues, obesity remains an epidemic.

People often describe the frustrations of trying to lose weight, whether it is through failed diets or exercise programs.  They either don’t lose weight at all or lose only to gain it back a month or two later. Effective weight loss programs that allow for long term success are desired but many patients struggle despite the available resources. The time constraints of work and family are difficult to overcome and patients often need help or a jump start to get their weight loss regimen going.

The cornerstones of an appropriate diet to lose weight include lowering caloric intake, decreasing complex carbohydrate ingestion, avoiding “empty calories” such as processed sugars and regular aerobic exercise. Fad or gimmick diets that help you to lose weight fast often lead to rebound weight gain and psychological distress.  Healthy weight loss should be targeted for 1-2 pounds per week over the course of many weeks.  The first five pounds usually come off fast and then the weight loss slows down.  People get discouraged and give up during this phase as it can be the most difficult part of the process.  Additionally, many patients suffer from uncontrollable appetite while dieting and this limits the effectiveness of the diet.

5 tips for weight loss

Recent data points to unique nutritional deficiencies as a contributing factor to Obesity. The medical foods  Apptrim and Apptrim-D  are specifically designed to treat these specific nutrient and  micro-nutrient deficiencies by supplying obese patients with a bioavailable source of amino acids and nutrients.  AppTrim and AppTrim-D contain the amino acids that specifically produce the neurotransmitters that are involved in controlling appetite, hunger and satiety.  Neurotransmitters are the brain’s messengers that tell the nerves what to do and help your stomach and brain communicate with each other. Obese patients often lack the neurotransmitters required to suppress appetite and food cravings. AppTrim helps to decrease appetite, carbohydrate cravings and improves early satiety thus helping an individual maintain a diet and weight loss goals.

Several double blind placebo controlled trials using AppTrim have been performed.  These studies have demonstrated that patients taking AppTrim along with diet and exercise lost more weight and felt less hungry than patients using diet and exercise alone.  Also, since AppTrim is a medical food, it contains only ingredients that are Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA. Obesity is a very complex disease and effective management requires a comprehensive approach that includes addressing the distinct nutrient and micro-nutrient deficiencies in addition to diet and exercise. 

1. Ogden C. L., Carroll, M. D., Kit, B.K., & Flegal K. M. (2014). Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011-2012. Journal of the American Medical Association, 311(8), 806-814

The Nutrient Management of Hypertension

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is elevated.  Blood pressure measures the force pushing outward on your arterial walls.  Since your body needs oxygen to survive, it is carried throughout the body.  Every time that your heart beats it is pumping oxygen through a network of blood vessels and capillaries.  There are two forces to every heart beat.  The first force occurs as blood pumps out of the heart and into the arteries that are part of the circulatory system, also known as systolic pressure.  The second force is created as the heart rests in between heartbeats, also known as diastolic pressure.  These are the two numbers that a person can see in a blood pressure reading.  Problems arise when there is too much force on the heart.  This can lead to conditions such as vascular weaknesses, vascular scarring, increased risk of blood clots, increased plaque build-up, tissue and organ damage from narrowed and blocked arteries, and increased workload on the circulatory system.  When cholesterol or plaque builds up because of scarring, the heart has to work harder in order to pump blood to the arteries.  This can eventually result in damage to the heart which can ultimately lead to heart failure.  This disease affects 76.4 million adults in the United States and can lead to heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure.

Hypertension is usually a symptomless condition with complications.  Usually people only feel symptoms in extreme readings, for example if their systolic reading is 180 or their diastolic is 110.  This is what is known as a hypertensive crisis.  It is important that adults be familiar with their blood pressure numbers on a consistent basis in order to prevent this disease from causing serious health issues.

There are simple ways to help control a person’s blood pressure.  According to the American Heart Association, there are 8 main ways to adopt a healthy lifestyle.  Eat a better diet (including reducing salt), regular physical activity, maintain a healthy weight, manage stress, avoid tobacco smoke, comply with medication prescriptions, limit alcohol, and understand hot tub safety.

Prescription medication is commonly used to help patients manage hypertension effectively.  One of the most commonly prescribed medications is lisinopril, a type of ACE Inhibitor that helps relax blood vessels keeping blood pressure low.  As with any drug therapy, there are good and bad side effects associated with lisinopril.  For example, lisinopril and other ACE inhibitors can cause a wide range of side effects, some less serious than others such as cough, dizziness, weakness, headaches, or nausea.  More serious side effects include swelling, difficulty breathing or swallowing, fever, fainting, and chest pain. Any patient taking this class of drugs should be aware of these side effects and monitor themselves at the onset of therapy and periodically throughout the course of therapy to ensure that the medication is more beneficial than harmful.

Another popular prescription option for patients with hypertension, are calcium channel blockers.  Calcium channel blockers relax and open up narrowed blood vessels by preventing calcium from entering the smooth muscle cells of the heart and arteries. The common side effects of this class of medications include headache, swelling, dizziness, flushing, fatigue, nausea, and palpitations.

Diuretics are also commonly prescribed and help expel excess sodium and fluid from the body in order to help control blood pressure.  Some of the side effects associated with diuretics are arrhythmia, extreme tiredness or weakness, muscle cramps, dizziness, fever, and dehydration.

Beta-blockers are also commonly used to treat hypertension. This class of medication is used to reduce heart rate, the heart’s workload, and the heart’s output of blood by preventing certain hormones from stimulating the heart. Side effects of beta blockers include diarrhea, depression, vomiting, depression, nightmares, and hallucinations.  One of the main dangers of beta-blockers is that if they are withdrawn suddenly conditions like angina can worsen, causing heart attacks or sudden death.

Doctors often hesitated to prescribe ACE inhibitors, beta blockers and diuretics until a patient’s blood pressure reaches 160/100. Anything below that level is deemed “mild hypertension” and not considered imminently dangerous, so a drugs’ potential side effects might outweigh their benefits. For patients with mild to moderate hypertension, nutritional interventions are commonly used in an effort to prevent the disease from progressing to a life threatening state.

A safe alternative for Hypertension is a medical food like Hypertensa® which are commonly used to expand blood vessels and improve blood flow through a natural pathway.  This class of medications addresses the increased nutritional demands of hypertension.  It uses specific amino acids and nutrients that are responsible for regulating blood pressure and vascular function.  Unlike drugs, medical foods address the production of the specific neurotransmitters that drive all the automatic functions of your body including heart rate and blood pressure.  Hypertension and many drugs that treat hypertension can alter the way the body uses these substances which are derived from both the diet and internal metabolic processes, creating deficiencies which cannot be fixed by altering diet alone.  By addressing the increased metabolic requirements of hypertension with nutritional interventions, the body will have the tools that it needs to help regulate blood pressure and heart rate.